Contemplate Monica Keena’s career trajectory with this week’s Dawson’s Creek TV Club Classic reviews

Contemplate Monica Keena’s career trajectory with this week’s Dawson’s Creek TV Club Classic reviews

Here’s what’s up in the world of TV for Tuesday, September 4. All times are Eastern.

TOP PICK

Dawson’s Creek (11 a.m.): Given her roles as the queen bitch of Capeside High and resident comedic head case on a cultishly beloved Judd Apatow sitcom, Monica Keena’s acting career ought to amount to more than a brief run on Entourage and pervy results from Google searches. Yet while her Dawson’s Creek and Undeclared co-stars receive nominations for Academy Awards, write and star in blockbuster comedies, and parody themselves on Don’t Trust The B----- In Apt. 23, the brightest upcoming light on Keena’s IMDb page involves playing would-be presidential assassin/Manson Family member “Squeaky” Fromme. Perhaps Brandon Nowalk, in his reviews of “High Risk Behavior” and “Sex, She Wrote” can enlighten us as to why Keena is yet to turn up as a background player in a Seth Rogen-Judd Apatow collaboration. 


REGULAR COVERAGE

MasterChef (Fox, 9 p.m.): After filling as much dead summer air as possible, MasterChef stretches its finale across two weeks, thus assuring Fox it need not dig up any programming free of cooking, dancing, Gordon Ramsay, or gross hotels until The X Factor returns. In other words, Phil Dyess-Nugent needs Demi Lovato now more than ever.

White Collar (USA, 9 p.m.): Neal and company stake out a museum in order to foil a spree of artifact thefts. If Kenny Herzog gets his wish, this will turn out to be the most thrilling homage to From The Mixed-Up Files Of Mrs. Basil E. Frankweiler ever committed to the small screen.


TV CLUB CLASSIC

Home Movies (3 p.m.): The Kafka opera gets all the glory, but Duane’s PSA from “Marbles” is Erik Adams’ pick for the first season of Home Movies’ greatest hit. Don’t put marbles in your nose, kids. Put them in there. Do not put them in there. 


WHAT ELSE IS ON

2012 Democratic National Convention (Various networks, 7 p.m.): The first official day of the convention only merits a night’s worth of coverage from PBS and the cable-news outlets; the broadcast networks, which can’t be bothered by an early convention day that doesn’t include performances by James Taylor, Jeff Bridges, and Janelle Monáe, cover day one with late-night newscasts.

Beverly Hills Nannies (ABC Family 9 p.m.): Excessive drinking, overwhelming plans for a baptism party, and feuding nannies? Yes, all those items in the plot synopsis make it sound like Beverly Hills Nannies did a bang-up job saving all the crazy for its season finale

Flipping Out (Bravo, 9 p.m.): It’s been a long time since this reality series was about flipping houses—the ailing U.S. housing market took care of that; season six, beginning tonight, focuses more on Jeff Lewis’ interior design clients. But is any Bravo series truly about anything more than its well-groomed stars sniping at and bitching about one another?

Happy Endings (ABC, 9:30 p.m.): Convention season and post-Labor Day doldrums are keeping new episodes of TV at bay—enjoy this rerun of the Happy Endings half-hour where Zachary Knighton seduces all his friends in their dreams.

The Thin Blue Line (Flix, 8 p.m.): Errol Morris’ documentary about a falsely accused death-row inmate spurred the regrettable trend of dramatic reenactments in documentary films—but don’t hold that against this engaging testament to art’s ability to affect social change.

Mr. Blandings Builds His Dream House (TCM, 8 p.m.): Cary Grant and Myrna Loy attempt to get out of the city and into a country-home fantasy that turns out to be more trouble than it’s worth—but at least it provides the source for plenty of rapid-fire patter.

MLB Baseball: Yankees at Rays (ESPN, 8 p.m.): Tampa Bay’s in the running for the American League Wild Card playoff, but it improving their chances in that department involves some wins against the division-leading Yankees.


IN CASE YOU MISSED IT

The L.A. Complex: Turns out Labour Day is celebrated on the same day as its American, “u”-less counterpart. However, that didn’t stop the Los Angeles-dwelling Canadians of The L.A. Complex from airing a new episode on Labour/Labor Day—and Phil Dyess-Nugent put down his hot dog just long enough to type out some thoughts on the hour. 

More What's On Tonight