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The Fast & The Furious series shows off $514 million in property damage, study claims

The Fate Of The Furious
The Fate Of The Furious

The Fast And The Furious series built its reputation by having cars do what cars usually don’t: flying through the air, firing harpoons, and exploding pretty much all of the time. Now, someone has tallied up all the damage those exploding flying harpoon cars have done over the franchise’s first seven installments, and it’s a pretty hefty bill: $514,000,000. (To be fair, it’s not like they’re called The Slow And The Well-Insured.)

That’s per The Hollywood Reporter, quoting a study done by insurance site InsureThe Gap. In what’s probably not a coincidence, the study found that the virtual property damage started skyrocketing around the time of Fast Five, the point where the films morphed from street racing crime dramas into one of the world’s biggest, loudest action franchises. Over the course of seven movies, Dom Toretto and his crew have destroyed or damaged more than 300 vehicles—including a W Motors Lykan Hypersport valued at $3.4 million—and damaged or brought down nearly 100 buildings.

Jason Statham’s villain character Deckard Shaw—set to recur in The Fate Of The Furious—has done the most individual damage, with $182 million to his name. Among the heroes, feuding candy asses Vin Diesel and Dwayne Johnson’s characters came in second and third. The study doesn’t include the franchise’s eighth movie, out on April 14, but what with all the flipping cars and giant submarines in the trailer, we’re pretty sure they’ll have to add a couple extra feet of chart space in order to contain all the fiscal mayhem it has in store.

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