Workaholics ends its season as it must: With fears of impending apocalypse

Workaholics ends its season as it must: With fears of impending apocalypse

Here’s what’s up in the world of TV for Wednesday, March 20. All times are Eastern.

TOP PICK
Workaholics (Comedy Central, 10 p.m.):
When Alice installs an automated phone system at the office, the guys worry about the rise of the machines and the end of the world, possibly because this is the season finale, and nobody knows if this show will return! No, we’re just kidding about that. It’ll be back again sometime, possibly even as soon as this summer, and we’ll be back to covering it, and everything will be just fine. And, hell, when that fourth season ends, you won’t have to worry then, because a fifth season’s been ordered too! So sit tight, enjoy tonight’s finale, and try to avoid getting worked up.


REGULAR COVERAGE
Arrow (The CW, 8 p.m.):
It’s been a couple of weeks since Arrow was on. How have you been in that time? Sitting on your couch? Eating junk food? Watching TV? Well, Stephen Amell has been working on his abs. Every day, all day, he’s been doing crunches and sit-ups and shit. Alasdair Wilkins is ashamed.

Survivor (CBS, 8 p.m.): Everybody at CBS has March Madness fever, and it’s making us remember all those years Survivor—even at the height of its popularity!—would have to get out of the way of the tournament and move to new Wednesday digs. Carrie Raisler thinks we shouldn’t mock Wednesdays.

Supernatural (The CW, 9 p.m.): Castiel, Crowley, and Meg? Sounds like it’s old home week on Supernatural. Phil Dyess-Nugent won’t rest until the show has resurrected Bobby, and he’s not afraid to keep bugging Jim Beaver on Twitter about it until Beaver somehow has any sort of say in the matter.

Suburgatory (ABC, 9:30 p.m.): Do you suppose it gets a little lonely for an ABC comedy without its Modern Family lead-in? Hang in there, Suburgatory! It’s only going to be a few more weeks before it’s back to save your ratings, and Brandon Nowalk won’t have to feel so very lonely anymore.

The Americans (FX, 10 p.m.): Somebody’s assassinating dudes, and Phillip and Elizabeth want to put an end to it? Why?! Assassination is one of the great joys of being a Cold War spy, or so we’ve been led to believe. Todd VanDerWerff and Genevieve Koski are improvising garrotes out of shoelaces and twine.

Psych (USA, 10 p.m.): This week’s episode is entitled “No Country For Two Old Men,” which can only mean that Shawn and Gus are going to get stalked through the back woods of Santa Barbara by a merciless killer with a terrible haircut. Kevin McFarland wonders if Santa Barbara even has back woods.

Southland (TNT, 10 p.m.): After last week’s stellar, series-best episode, is it too much to hope that the show can somehow keep the roll going, particularly as it looks increasingly likely that this is the end of the line for it? Kevin McFarland will be happy to no longer have to review three Wednesday shows!


TV CLUB CLASSIC
Slings & Arrows (1 p.m.):
We’re just nine episodes in, and we’ve reached the halfway point of the whole series, which is the sort of thing that happens when you review these shortened shows. Todd VanDerWerff is still trying to figure out what the fuck a “dromeo” is. (Just kidding. He has Google.)

TV Roundtable (1 p.m.): Leave it to renowned softy Phil Dyess-Nugent to pick an episode of Ally McBeal where Robert Downey, Jr., sings a sad song at a piano for the ol’ roundtable. In fact, we’d have been surprised if he hadn’t picked something that made us all cry, because he’s a kind-hearted old fool.


WHAT ELSE IS ON
Foodiculous (Travel Channel, 8 p.m.):
We had a whole parody song worked out to the tune of “Bootylicious” in order to do a blurb about a new show called Foodilicious, but this show is clearly called Foodiculous, and that just won’t scan. No, we don’t know what it’s about. No, we’re not looking it up.

KKK: Beneath The Hood (Discovery, 8 p.m.): The Discovery Channel decides now is the time to take us behind the scenes of the Ku Klux Klan, perhaps removing the hood of one of its members and revealing the howling darkness and cacophony that is contained within. Or, y’know, some racist Southern guy.

Through The Wormhole With Morgan Freeman (Science, 9 p.m.): The latest installment of a series whose title always makes us titter just a little bit for reasons we’re not precisely clear on take on the “God particle.” Your titles for porn versions of this show are welcomed and encouraged in comments.

CSI: Crime Scene Investigation (CBS, 10 p.m.): Has this show really not done a high-school reunion plot until this point? Anyway, one of the CSI-ies—we don’t know what to call them anymore—goes to his high-school reunion, and somebody ends up dead there. Good thing there’s a lab tech in the house!

Arthur (HBO Signature, 9 p.m.): Russell Brand steps into Dudley Moore’s shoes, in a move that seems destined to remind everyone that life is a crushing disappointment and everything is just going to keep getting slightly worse until the world ends. On the other hand, Jennifer Garner and Greta Gerwig!

2010 (TCM, 9:30 p.m.): A wholly unnecessary sequel to 2001: A Space Odyssey attempts to answer many of the strange questions left by the original’s enigmatic ending without the guiding hand of Stanley Kubrick and mostly just makes you realize some things are better left unexplained.

NIT Basketball Tournament: Long Beach State at Baylor (ESPN2, 9 p.m.): The real action starts tomorrow, but for you hipsters out there who were way into the NCAA Tournament before it got too commercial, here’s a chance to watch the teams who weren’t good enough to make it play some hoops.


IN CASE YOU MISSED IT
Splash (Tuesday):
People think we “made” Ryan McGee watch this celebrity diving spectacular, when, really, he volunteered for it. Okay, he volunteered because we held a gun to his dog’s head. And we told him if he didn’t he’d be first off the board in our celebrity diving show. And, okay, yeah, we made him.