Kelley Deal

Kelley Deal

Kelley Deal's career as a member of The Breeders was cut short by a much-publicized drug arrest in 1995. After a stint in a Minneapolis rehab center, she emerged again in 1996 with a new band, The Kelley Deal 6000, and the album Go To The Sugar Altar. While in The Breeders with sister Kim, Deal was famous for having learned guitar simply to be in the band. As Boom! Boom! Boom!, Deal's strong recent album, demonstrates, she's come a long way since then, and not just in terms of musicianship: Deal wrote or co-wrote all tracks on the record, and released it on her own label. Recently, Deal spoke to The Onion about her solo career, life on the road, and the pleasures of crossword puzzles.

The Onion: Which are you more tired of talking about: your relationship with your sister, or your drug and rehab experiences?

Kelley Deal: [Laughs.] It's really a toss-up. It's an absolute toss-up.

O: Say you had to choose one.

KD: I'm more tired of talking about Kim. Because people want an answer on that, and there's no answer. You know? Plus, I can't talk about Kim. If you have questions for her, call her. I feel uncomfortable.

O: And it would probably be like living your relationship through the media.

KD: Yeah, it would be rude, I think. I don't want her talking about me, only because she doesn't know what I'm doing. I'd have to interview her first and then talk to you.

O: It seems like you're doing plenty. You have your own record label, and you're on tour. How's life on the road?

KD: As the guitarist explains it, it's like a big slumber party. Because I'm constantly in my pajamas.

O: Even on stage?

KD: Actually, I do change, unlike Kim.

O: After the tour, are you ready for a new album?

KD: Yeah, I am. Funny you should say that.

O: Have you got the material together already?

KD: Well, I've got like songs on a four-track, and another four in my head, but not on a four-track. I've got maybe three really strong melody lines I want to investigate. And I've got one title. So they're in different stages.

O: Do you find it easy to write on the road?

KD: It's weird, because it's just complicated. It's like, "Okay, let me get my tuner out... Wait, wait, that was a big curve there. Okay." Plus, you're always a little bit busy. So I like to do crossword puzzles. And actually, I think of a lot of stuff on the bus. So I probably do write, but in a different way. I don't compose. I'm not much of a composer anyway.