MTV will make sad millennials feel all better

MTV will make sad millennials feel all better

Television continues to find the funny in the ongoing plight of "millennials"—so bright and hip and Facebooked, yet so unfairly pushed out of the job market by older generations who refuse to just die already—particularly if said millennials are also pretty young ladies. Now it seems the “underemployed single gal in the city” sob stories of Lena Dunham’s Girls, Michael Patrick King’s Two Broke Girls, and ABC’s Don’t Trust The Bitch In Apt. 23 will be joined by MTV’s new single-camera comedy about five Chicago twentysomethings who discover that life after college isn’t all it’s cracked up to be—each show playing its own world’s tiniest violin, uniting in harmony to create the world’s tiniest string concerto just for you, millennials.

Anyway, Dirty Sexy Money creator Craig Wright is handling this untitled story of five coed pals who graduate at the top of their class, confident that their sharp wits and dazzling complexions will help them take the world by storm, only to find themselves working crappy jobs because nothing is available in their chosen field. “It's about post-college reality versus the amplified expectations,” says MTV’s David Janollari. “Exploring all the firsts from love, family, friends and career in today's post-Gen X world." Which sounds an awful lot like the Gen-X world, too.

But just as Gen-Xers were able to persevere through a combination of lowered expectations, defensive sarcasm, and thrift-store shopping, it sounds like these kids are also gonna be all right: The last line of the pilot finds the narrator (an aspiring novelist, and the show’s resident source of Carrie Bradshaw-esque epigrams, apparently) musing, “If life is about making money, we're all screwed. But if life is about living, then none of my friends are underemployed.” Aww. Status update: You are special.

Filed Under: TV

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