Stocker

Following the success of The Cannonball Run and Cannonball Run II, racing (and mustache) enthusiasts everywhere tried to recreate the cinematic excitement for themselves on our wonderful interstate highway system. Tragically, law enforcement had other ideas, and cross-country races were forced underground, into the dark mysterious confines of the video arcade.

Gameplay: To simplify your race experience, Bally's vehicle designers have done away with that pesky gas pedal, and replaced it with a simple two-speed shifting lever: You can go "L" or "H." Unfortunately, they weren't able to get rid of that annoying fuel consumption, so you have to fill up at every gas station you pass, or your tank will run dry. Fortunately, you can drive pretty much wherever you want without crashing, including right into lakes and rivers, and it only takes eight seconds to drive across Alabama. And what would a cross-country race be without police? A boring family road trip, that's what. There are cops everywhere, and if they catch you, you'll get a ticket. Run out of gas, collect three tickets, or actually finish the race, and your game is over.

Could be mistaken for: Super Sprint, a televised high-speed chase on the 11 o'clock news, Night Stocker

Kids today might not like it because: The tinny synthesized music is a poor substitute for Ray Stevens' Cannonball Run theme song.

Kids today might like it because: Most of the kids today haven't even heard of Ray Stevens, so the music probably won't be an issue after all.

Enduring contribution to gaming history: Cruisin' and Out Run are just two of the racing games that can claim Stocker as part of their pedigree. —Wil Wheaton

Wil Wheaton once took his whole family to Florida for a vacation, and when he got there, the state was closed, Clark.

Image courtesy of the International Arcade Museum and the Killer List Of Video Games.

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