Video offers “irrefutable proof” that Bill Hicks is Alex Jones

Video offers “irrefutable proof” that Bill Hicks is Alex Jones

French poet Charles Baudelaire famously wrote that “the devil’s finest trick is to persuade you that he does not exist,” which people most likely recall from Verbal Kint paraphrasing it in The Usual Suspects when referring to his employer Keyser Soze. What follows is a decades-old spoiler alert so be warned: It turns out that Verbal Kint is Keyser Soze, and if that is news then perhaps you aren’t that in touch with pop culture.

In order to hide in plain sight one must not simply adopt a look and name different than those which they seek to conceal, but to actively misdirect the observer like an expert magician. Hence Soze takes on the persona of Kint, with his limp and soft-spoken demeanor, subverting the attention of the law, just like how lizard people pretend to be our politicians in order to run the government.

If then, someone like the late Bill Hicks, a famously acid-tongued stand-up comedian and social critic, wanted to disappear while remaining in the public eye, perhaps the easiest way to achieve this would be by becoming a conspiracy theory-touting right wing media host. Too crazy an idea to even consider?

Poor sheeple, how you have been deceived. According to a new video that you can watch on the Internet (or alternately listen to on the radio in your teeth), Hicks—who passed away in 1994 due to pancreatic cancer—was in fact actually conscripted by the CIA, brainwashed, and now operates as lachrymose agent of agitprop Alex Jones. Misdirection, see? It makes perfect sense.

Hicks and Jones admittedly do share a passing similarity in looks, and both are given to passionate oratory, but Hicks existed on a wildly different side of the political divide than Jones. It also bears repeating that Hicks died 20 years ago, while Jones is a person who is alive, but don’t let’s get bogged down with such “red herring” details. Have you studied their teeth?

The video operates on several levels, acting as an unveiling of a Hicks-as-Jones conspiracy, taking aim at the purported one world government, all while smearing Jones, insinuating him as merely a puppet of the same government he claims to rail against. However if it should accomplish anything, it should be to remind us of the unfiltered brilliance of Hicks, whose comedy is still vibrant and important 20 years after his death. Oh, and also that the Internet is literally populated by insane people.


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