Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd

Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd

South Park creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone were at one point slated to write a prequel to Dumb And Dumber. They eventually passed on the project, as did virtually everyone involved with the original, leaving the thankless task of resurrecting one of the Farrelly brothers' weaker efforts to co-writer, producer, and director Troy Miller, whose résumé includes at least one enduring comedy classic (Mr. Show) and a whole lot of television projects with titles like The Best Commercials You've Never Seen and Battle Of The Sitcoms. Seemingly made for the money New Line would have paid Parker and Stone, the wildly unambitious Dumb And Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd casts Eric Christian Olsen and Derek Richardson in roles originated by Jim Carrey and Jeff Daniels. Set in the mid-'80s–which makes the prominent use of "Ice Ice Baby" more than a little bit anachronistic–the film has Olsen and Richardson literally run into each other on the first day of school, and instantly bond over their shared stupidity and knack for consistently misunderstanding the world around them. Wasted comedy ringers Eugene Levy and Cheri Oteri co-star, respectively, as the boys' principal and lunch lady/teacher, who plot to defraud the school system by setting up a phony special-needs program. The dimwitted high-schoolers accidentally stumble their way toward exposing the caterpillar-browed principal and his lunchroom love, but not before 80 minutes or so of mild, misfired, slowly dispensed gags, as well as tedious dumb-guy banter that was already driven into the ground by Dumb And Dumberer's predecessor. For a prequel to a Farrelly brothers comedy, it goes surprisingly light on the gross-out gags: The bodily-fluid-in-someone's-drink bit is hauled out, and gas is passed, but otherwise, Dumb And Dumberer's raunchiest bit involves Bob Saget mistaking a melted Hershey bar for feces, then cursing profusely. Just about the only evidence of Miller's past creative triumph comes from brief appearances by Mr. Show alumni Jill Talley and Brian Posehn, the latter playing a convenience-store clerk whose annoyed, hostile, exasperated response to the protagonists' antics makes him an audience surrogate.

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