A.V. Club Most Read

News Newswire Great Job, Internet!
TV Club All Reviews What's On Tonight
Video All Video A.V. Undercover A.V. Cocktail Club Film Club
Reviews All Reviews Film TV Music Books
Features All Features Newswire Coming Distractions
Sections Film Tv Music Food Comedy Books Games Aux
Our Company About Us Contact Advertise Privacy Policy Careers RSS
Onion Inc. Sites The Onion The A.V. Club ClickHole Onion Studios

Guilty Simpson: O.J. Simpson

B+

Guilty Simpson

Album: O.J. Simpson
Label: Stones Throw

Community Grade (2 Users)

  • A
  • A-
  • B+
  • B
  • B-
  • C+
  • C
  • C-
  • D+
  • D
  • D-
  • F

Your Grade

?

This year’s fantastic In Search Of Stoney Jackson was a Strong Arm Steady album, but it was really all about super-producer Madlib, who lent his acid-soaked, purple-and-paisley stamp to every psychedelic beat and oddball interlude. The eccentric Oxnard producer, born Otis Jackson Jr., goes even further on O.J. Simpson, his punningly named new collaboration with J-Dilla protégé Guilty Simpson. Not content merely to scribble in the margins, Madlib devotes half the album to sound collages loaded with blaxploitation dialogue, old stand-up routines, and sound bites from party records. The other half is a series of vehicles for Simpson’s gruff swagger, clever punchlines, and ferocious battle-raps. Guilty Simpson has been on a track-stealing spree lately, dominating collaborations with folks like Illa J (Dilla’s younger brother), MF Doom, Strong Arm Steady, Royce Da 5’9”, and Elzhi. While he doesn’t have the visceral impact as a solo artist that he did as a supporting player, Simpson has more than enough rough-hewn charisma to carry an album whose only guest turns come from Strong Arm Steady and Frank of Frank N Dank. Madlib’s free-associative, abstract stoner comedy and Simpson’s body-slamming delivery and tough talk prove complementary, since Guilty is funny in his own right; he’s a witty badass who will kick people’s asses and make them laugh. Madlib has made standout collaborative albums with MF Doom and J-Dilla. While Guilty is a newcomer rather than an underground giant, he proves here that he deserves to breathe the same rarified air as Madlib’s better-known partners in rhyme.