Kardinal Offishall: Firestarter Volume 1: Quest For Fire

Kardinal Offishall: Firestarter Volume 1: Quest For Fire

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Kardinal Offishall

Album: Firestarter Volume 1: Quest For Fire
Label: MCA
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Kardinal Offishall

Album: Firestarter Volume 1: Quest For Fire
Label: MCA

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Just as Canada is often overshadowed by its neighbor to the south, Canadian rappers have struggled to carve out an identity within the insular and territorial world of hip-hop. Canadian rap may still bear an unfair stigma, but a thriving underground scene has worked to change that. The process should be quickened by the audacious major-label debut of Toronto's Kardinal Offishall. Proudly repping Toronto, Offishall wastes no time in asserting his music's cultural validity. Quest For Fire's first song, "BaKardi Slang," serves as a thumping primer on north-of-the-border street slang, a sort of Canuck version of Big L's much-loved "Ebonics." Offishall's national pride doesn't stop there: In addition to criticizing Canada's submissive policies toward America on "Powerfulll," he's also stocked his album with a strictly Canadian lineup of producers and guest stars. But rather than stack the odds with high-priced ringers and hotshot producers, Offishall carries the brunt of the album's lyrical and musical weight himself, a move that gives Fire impressive musical and lyrical consistency. Song titles like "Mic T.H.U.G.S." and "Ol' Time Killin'" might suggest thuggish tendencies, but Offishall's aggression is strictly musical, while his smart, confident lyrics deftly mix celebratory swagger, social criticism, and understated spirituality. A distant cousin of The Coup's "Fat Cats, Bigga Fish," "Husslin'" reminds listeners that the illicit machinations of corporations and governments generally dwarf the petty schemes of small-time hustlers, while the penetrating "Man By Choice" addresses institutional racism. Elsewhere, Offishall showcases his irreverent side with "UR Ghetto 2002," and pays homage to his Caribbean roots with "Maxine." At 60+ minutes, Quest For Fire drags toward the end, but Offishall's smart, infectious, promising debut marks a massive step forward in Canadian hip-hop's unsteady musical and cultural evolution.

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