Moby: Last Night

Moby's last album, Hotel, shot up the charts of those curious mid-period albums by artists who seem to have lost all interest in their own enterprise at the most fundamental level. That couldn't have been what he was going for, but the glaring mess of it all certainly made the album's glum quasi-rock songs more memorable than they might have been otherwise.

So consider it a wise move on Moby's part to regroup. Or rather than regroup, to return to his formative form as a DJ and producer of what, well before 1999's Play made him a certifiable star, used to be called rave music. Last Night's rewind approach may be too screamingly literal for those wanting or expecting some sort of progress to be strived for—see Grandmaster Caz rapping about "the old school taking it back" on "I Love To Move In Here," or another song actually titled "Everyday It's 1989"—but Last Night is nonetheless an extremely warm, loving, moving album concerned with more than just vintage sounds.

Antic tracks like "257.zero" and "Disco Lies" find Moby revisiting the sort of functional dance beats and dramatic synthesizer sighs that made his name. And then there are many rave-y piano vamps with throaty divas belting songs of redemption—the kind, it turns out, that make "Everyday It's 1989" play like a track for the ages.

More Music Review