Get Out’s Oscar nominations were a welcome surprise from the stodgy Academy

The Oscars are less than a month away, but there are a handful of films from this year’s Best Picture lineup we haven’t covered on Film Club. So we’re catching up with these contenders in a few special-edition episodes. Today, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky discuss one of last…

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Black Panther is one of Marvel's best and most dramatically complex movies

A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky return to discuss the latest—and one of the greatest—from Marvel Studios, Black Panther. Directed by Creed and Fruitvale Station’s Ryan Coogler, Black Panther veers from the template established by Marvel’s previous 18 films by introducing a…

Are the detractors right about Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri?

The Oscars are less than a month away, but there are a handful of films from this year’s Best Picture lineup we haven’t covered on Film Club. So we’re catching up with these contenders in a few special-edition episodes. Today, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky argue the merits of …

The Academy’s taste may be improving, but it still finds room for Oscar bait like Darkest Hour

The Oscars are less than a month away, but there are a handful of films from this year’s Best Picture lineup we haven’t covered on Film Club. So we’re catching up with these contenders in a few special-edition episodes. First up, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky discuss Darkest Hour

Clint Eastwood directing military men with no acting experience goes about as well as expected

A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky are kicking off a new season of Film Club by discussing Clint Eastwood’s The 15:17 To Paris, the latest film in the director’s recent streak of biographical thrillers, following Sully and American Sniper. Like those films, 15:17 explores real-life…

The Last Jedi brings the weird and the cool back to Star Wars

For the final Film Club of 2017, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff writer Ignatiy Vishnevetsky are discussing what is sure to be the biggest film of the year, Star Wars: The Last Jedi. Although it’s the middle chapter of the sequel trilogy, The Last Jedi avoids being a retread of The Empire Strikes Back,…

If Happy End is indeed his last film, Michael Haneke deserves a better send-off

In today’s second edition of Film Club, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky are discussing the latest—and possibly final—film from Michael Haneke, Happy End, a family drama set in Northern France during the European refugee crisis. If this is in fact Haneke’s last film, it functions…

Christian Bale’s mustache is the best thing about Hostiles

We’re back with another edition of Film Club. Today, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky are discussing the period Western Hostiles, a film that reunites Christian Bale and director Scott Cooper—their first collaboration being 2013’s Out Of The Furnace—for an original story about a…

Margot Robbie is great, but I, Tonya is still about as sensationalistic as a tabloid

A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky sit down to discuss the Goodfellas-biting biopic I, Tonya, starring Margot Robbie as the disgraced figure skater. Craig Gillespie’s sensationalist take on the Tonya Harding story covers her life, her career, and of course the 1994 attack on Nancy…

The Post shows Spielberg's ideals—but not his wit

In this special afternoon edition of Film Club, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff writer Ignatiy Vishnevetsky sit down to discuss Steven Spielberg’s new film, The Post, about The Washington Post’s role in the 1971 publication of a leaked history of the United States’ operations in Vietnam. The film, which…

The Shape Of Water is Guillermo Del Toro at peak cinephile

We’re back with another edition of Film Club. This week, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky discuss Guillermo Del Toro’s The Shape Of Water, a Cold War-era love story between a woman and a fishman that also doubles as a romance between Del Toro and his lifelong infatuation with…

Our critics sing the praises of Armie Hammer and Call Me By Your Name

We’re back with another edition of Film Club. This week, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky sit down to discuss Call Me By Your Name, the latest from Italian director Luca Guadagnino, and one of the most acclaimed films to come out of 2017’s Sundance Film Festival.

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Our critics debate the merits of DC's Justice League

It’s been more than a year and a half since A.V. Club’s A.A. Dowd and Ignatiy Vishnevetsky last sat down to debate the merits (or lack thereof) of a Zack Snyder superhero movie. But now, duty calls them to return to the bombastic Snyder-verse with a look at Justice League, an intentional course-correction for the DC…

Our film critics dive into Richard Linklater’s latest, Last Flag Flying

On this episode of Film Club, A.V. Club critics A.A. Dowd and Ignatiy Vishnevetsky talk about Last Flag Flying, Richard Linklater’s spiritual sequel (of sorts) to the classic Hal Ashby film The Last Detail. It’s billed as the hangout-flick master’s first proper road movie, a 2003-set drama about three Vietnam veterans…

Noah Baumbach throws the dysfunctional family reunion of the year

Just about every movie by Noah Baumbach (Kicking And Screaming, Frances Ha) is a study of prickly personalities. But with The Meyerowitz Stories (New And Selected), which arrives in select theaters and on Netflix tomorrow, the New York writer-director creates a whole family tree of neurotics, then populates it with…

Like too many Scorsese imitations, Tom Cruise’s American Made wants for a worldview

Doug Liman and Tom Cruise, the director-actor team behind Edge Of Tomorrow (one of our favorite science-fiction movies of the last three-and-a-half-decades), have reunited for American Made, a years-spanning biopic about a real-life pilot who got drafted into both the CIA and a South American drug-smuggling operation.…

Our critics check into The Florida Project, one of the year’s best and most exuberantly alive movies

For his follow-up to the riotous underground comedy Tangerine, writer-director Sean Baker heads south to the Sunshine State, where he turns his camera on the occupants of a purple-painted motel called The Magic Castle. The Florida Project, which starts trickling into theaters tomorrow, traces the ups and downs of the…

Could Blade Runner 2049 have used a little more grit to go with its epic awe?

After 35 years of science-fiction movies only inspired by—or blatantly derivative of—Ridley Scott’s landmark dystopian noir, they finally made another Blade Runner: a nearly three-hour, big-budget art movie masquerading as a blockbuster, starring Ryan Gosling as a new era’s robot-hunting answer to Harrison Ford (who…