Beyond “Monster Mash”: 60 minutes of killer tunes for your graveyard smash

Halloween is on a Wednesday this year, which means that all but the most dedicated creeps will be throwing their Halloween parties this weekend. And while it’s tempting to just put “Monster Mash” on repeat and wait for someone to call you out on it, you want your guests to stick around through the witching hour, right?

Fembots, dancing queens, and love fools: 60 minutes of Swedish pop

A 2013 article in The Atlantic asked a very good, non-rhetorical question: “Why is Sweden so good at pop music?” The fascinating article outlined some potential answers—prioritization of melodies, government support of artistic endeavors, a supportive community, embrace of cutting-edge technology and sounds—but missed…

60 minutes proving De La Soul is one of hip-hop’s greats—but its legacy is in danger

De La Soul is one of the most culturally significant and musically influential hip-hop groups from the late ’80s and ’90s, but you wouldn’t know it from looking at the current digital realm of music that actually gets listened to. That’s because, by and large, De La Soul isn’t there. Thanks to a messy thicket of legal…

Moving out from “The Middle”: 60 minutes of eternal adolescence with Jimmy Eat World

A couple of years ago, a strange blip appeared on the music-sales matrix. Jimmy Eat World’s “The Middle,” an infectious dollop of alt-rock ear candy that hit the radio like a sugar rush a decade and a half prior, was suddenly back in heavy rotation. There it was, sitting pretty at No. 16 on Billboard’s Hot Rock Songs…

60 minutes proving the ’90s is when punk covers of pop hits first swarmed the mainstream

Punk bands love to cover pop songs. If there’s a universal thread running through the genre from practically the moment of its birth to the present, it’s the continual appropriating of sugary-sweet Top 40 hits with the avowed goal of speeding them up and adding distorted guitars. Whether you’re talking about Sid…

Hear the scope of Liz Phair’s underrated career in 58 minutes

Liz Phair’s triumph and curse is that she made a classic album. Her first record, 1993’s Exile In Guyville, was a galvanizing response album to The Rolling Stones’ Exile On Main Street that continues to stand perfectly on its own today. It’s smart, explicit, spare, and unsparing—an indie rock classic. Then she had the…

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