Even the end of the galaxy fails to destroy the importance of hope on Wander Over Yonder

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The series finale of Person of Interest was fantastic. The show overall dealt with many prescient issues: the role of technology in our lives, the dangers of the surveillance state, the delicate balance between privacy rights and security, but the finale focused on the contentious relationship between man and machine.…

Character dynamics reveal the key to stopping Dominator in two perfect Wander episodes

I doubt Craig McCracken and his team created “The Robomechabotatron” and “The Flower” with the knowledge that this season was going to be its last. Instead, it feels like these episodes were structured around the reveal that there is a way to, if not directly defeat Dominator, at least stand up to her evilness. There…

Wander learns the extent of his altruism in two solid Wander Over Yonder episodes

I enjoy the episodes that bring a little more situational context to Wander’s passion for helping people. It’s easy and pat to create a happy-go-lucky character who just helps random people–basically, a mascot that exists to teach kids various lessons. Helping others, or generally being nice to people, is definitely…

Wander Over Yonder’s usual mastery in genre parodies comes up surprisingly short

Wander Over Yonder loves to do two things: experiment, with episodes like “The Void” or “The Breakfast,” and play with genre conventions, with episodes like “The Cartoon” and “The Hero.” Generally, Wander knocks it out of the park when playing around with styles and meta-styles, allowing the writers and animators to…

Sylvia takes the spotlight in two strong, if ambivalent, Wander Over Yonder episodes

The headline here sort of buries the lede. “The Night Out” is the first time the show actually explores another side to Dominator, a character that–despite the show’s best efforts–never quite received the kind of development it promised. Sure, we know how she functions: as an absolute evil figure who gets her kicks…

Wander Over Yonder uses time travel to show how far our main characters have come

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From a plotting perspective, the time travel narrative is inherently nonsense. There’s just so many rules, you know? And those rules are driven by various degrees of belief: logical, scientific, metaphoric, mathematical, paradoxical, causal–I could go on (and that’s not getting into the “causal loop” or…

Wander Over Yonder uses parodies to successfully showcase style over substance

So yes, I read Craig McCracken’s post about continuity. It’s an informative piece for sure: cartoons tend to avoid continuity because, bottom line, it’s a hard sell to networks, which thrives on random repeats to keep eyeballs on the screen (although this may change crucially in the streaming era). I’m not at all…

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