Lars von Trier doesn’t need a press conference to shock the hell out of the Cannes Film Festival

There would be no press conference. That much was agreed upon in advance, probably by all parties involved. After all, the last time Lars von Trier sat down for a little Q&A at Cannes—this was back in 2011, to talk about Melancholia—he ended up causing quite the stir, joking (?) about identifying with Hitler and…

Read This: Movies have gotten scarier by learning to manipulate the brain

Director Alfred Hitchcock once dreamed of being able to play his audience “like a giant organ,” manipulating people’s emotions at will as they watched his movies. He even imagined bypassing the movies all together and simply attaching electrodes to people’s heads and stimulating their emotions via push buttons. Today, …

Lars von Trier will make an English-language TV show with a “huge cast”

Lars von Trier was in Venice, screening the director’s cut of his Nymphomaniac films, when he “appeared” on a panel with Stellan Skarsgard and producer Louise Vesth. The Danish filmmaker Skyped in and didn’t answer questions directly, keeping the promise he made after that whole Nazi debacle a few years ago. Instead,…

Lars von Trier’s second amateur short is a lot more Lars von Trier-ian

Adolescence is difficult for everyone, but some people take it especially hard. Young Lars Trier (the “von” came later) must have been one of them, because in three years he went from making a suspiciously cheerful animated film starring a “super sausage” to this unnerving short. Indulgently titled “Why Escape From It…

Watch a movie by an 11 -year -old Lars von Trier that’s probably about Nazis or something

A short film directed by a then-11-year-old Lars von Trier has surfaced online, and it appears to be strangely… happy? Well-adjusted? Not incredibly misogynistic? Titled Turen Til Squashland… En Super Pølse Film ( which translates to Trip To Squash Land…A Super Sausage Film), the deceptively cheerful short was created…

Breaking The Waves was a major turning point in Lars Von Trier’s career

It’s hard to remember now, but Lars Von Trier had a radically different reputation back in 1996, when Breaking The Waves premiered at the Cannes Film Festival. His previous features, from The Element Of Crime (1984) to Europa (1991, released in the U.S. as Zentropa), had been audacious exercises in pure style,…

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