In its penultimate episode, Alias Grace thrives on uncertainty

“Part 5” drives home the notion that there’s no way to know for certain all that happened on the day Nancy Montgomery was thrown down the cellar stairs and choked to death and Thomas Kinnear was shot. Grace calls her own narrative into question, needling viewers on with little questions that sow the seeds of doubt…

Alias Grace shows the deadly effects of limited abortion access

Even though they’re very different shows, I found myself thinking about How To Get Away With Murder while watching “Part 2” of Alias Grace and comparing both shows’ approaches to murder mystery. How To Get Away With Murder gets off on being as withholding as possible. It keeps its twists so tightly locked up that…

Alias Grace’s stars on why the show is going to make you uncomfortable

Set in the 1840s, Alias Grace, an adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s novel of the same name, is a fictionalized look at Grace Marks, a domestic servant convicted of murdering her employer. The show doesn’t shy away from the painful realities of women, and is meant to challenge the audience with weighty themes and harsh…

Alias Grace’s stars on the recent resurgence of Margaret Atwood

Alias Grace marks 2017’s third adaptation of a Margaret Atwood novel, the first two being Hulu’s The Handmaid’s Tale and CBC Kids’ Wandering Wenda. Set in the 1840s, Alias Grace is a fictionalized look at Grace Marks, a domestic servant convicted of murdering her employer. In the video above, stars Sarah Gadon and…

Philip Roth’s Indignation becomes a character study worth examining

A sense of dread hangs over Indignation, the first feature directed by James Schamus, former CEO of Focus Features. Schamus produced—and sometimes had a hand in writing—a litany of great films, working with Ang Lee on the likes of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and Brokeback Mountain. His directorial debut, based on a …

The present trumps the past on a solid episode of 11.22.63

For all the talk about the past pushing back on 11.22.63 (both the book and the series), when things get really complicated, it’s always the present that interferes. “Happy Birthday, Lee Harvey Oswald” calls back to that advice Jake got from Al, way back at the beginning: don’t get involved, don’t get personal, don’t…

11.22.63 hits the fast-forward button

After the furious, claustrophobic menace of “The Kill Floor,” 11.22.63 and Jake “Amberson” both settle in to take care of some business. It’s important stuff. Some of it’s even good stuff (and a lot of it is). But the trouble with checking items off a to-do list is that it can be pretty flat. It’s got to get done, but…