Calling the latest from videogame-to-movie specialist Uwe Boll a disappointment may seem insufficient, given that in some circles, Boll has been likened to a modern-day Ed Wood. There's no question that BloodRayne (Uwe Boll Productions) is another dreadful effort, telling the confused story of a half-human/half-vampire woman searching for the beast who sired her. But in spite of bizarre turns by Billy Zane and Meat Loaf, it doesn't quite reach the camp hysteria of Boll's Alone In The Dark. Perhaps the "Unrated Director's Cut" will be more packed with blunders, or at least some more hot dungeon sex with Lady Terminator Kristanna Loken…

Without Felicity Huffman's Oscar-nominated performance, it's hard to imagine that anyone could care about Transamerica (Weinstein), a generic indie road movie about a pre-op male-to-female transsexual who reunites with her screwed-up son. With honesty and brusque wit, Huffman staves off the bathos for as long as possible, but after a couple days of bonding on the quirky byways between New York and the West Coast, the film is practically drowning in it…

The ultimate comfort-food sitcom, Wings lasted eight seasons on NBC (and in perpetual reruns on USA), relying on little more than the genial rivalry between commuter-pilot brothers Tim Daly and Steven Weber, and a cast of eccentrics that included future character-actor stars Tony Shalhoub and Thomas Haden Church. The Wings: The Complete First & Second Seasons (Paramount) set contains 28 episodes, designed to be watched at any time and in any order, without disturbing viewers…

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The typically dense and mundane Don DeLillo-penned Game 6 (Hart Sharp) stars Michael Keaton as a New York playwright (and Boston Red Sox fan) whose new show is opening on the night of the sixth game of the 1986 World Series. As he journeys across the city, reconnecting with friends and family, Keaton wonders whether his favorite team's inevitable failure says anything about his own life…

Fans of vapid self-absorption among attractive, chatty young people—and no doubt they are legion—would be wise to check out London (Sony), a claustrophobic, stylishly empty drama about motormouthed coke enthusiasts. It wastes yet another colorful performance from Jason Statham, who is once again the best thing about a very bad movie.