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Through a series of misunderstandings, the boys become trapped in a biodome with a group of scientists funded by cranky millionaire Henry Gibson, and led by William Atherton, playing yet another cranky, easily angered authority figure.

Rather than admitting to the mishap and ejecting Shore and Baldwin, the researchers decide to use them as the human personification of the Chaos Theory. Shore and Baldwin soon come to understand the ramifications of being part of the biodome experiment:

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Stupid and manic doesn't begin to describe either Bio-Dome or Shore and Baldwin's hyper-caffeinated performances. They're whirling dervishes of misplaced energy, bouncing off walls, ricocheting off each other, indulging in silly dances, and generally making giddy, gleeful, unapologetic asses of themselves. The two communicate in a singular dialect that at times sounds almost like English; it combines surfer patois, elementary Ebonics, homemade slang, and nonstop pop-culture references.

For its first half-hour or so, Bio-Dome is almost transcendently stupid. It borders on avant-garde in its contempt for linear storytelling and comprehensible dialogue. Like Boat Trip, Bio-Dome is so crazily over-the-top and shameless that it almost becomes a parody of idiotic, high-concept comedies.

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But that level of numbskull kinetic energy is difficult, if not impossible, to sustain for an entire film. Bio-Dome gradually becomes a more conventional, less inspired slobs-vs.-snobs comedy, with Shore proving incontrovertibly, "Just because we're stuck in a bubble doesn't mean we can't cause any trouble."

He and Baldwin wreak havoc throughout the carefully planned ecosystem with their madcap antics. For instance, they uncover a stash of munchies and a nitrous oxide tank, and enjoy a laughing-gas-fueled freakout. It's an exquisitely redundant development, since they behave like drug-addled delinquents even when they aren't huffing gas. Bio-Dome is essentially Stoned Idiots Amusing Themselves: The Movie. That's probably the nicest thing that can be said about it.

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In a wholly unexpected development, Shore and Baldwin teach the uptight scientists (including a shamefully fully clothed Kylie Minogue) how to loosen up and have fun, and the scientists teach the boys a lesson or two about maturity and the importance of preserving mother Earth. But first, Shore and Baldwin break free from the dome and throw a giant party that contaminates the biosphere and puts the entire experiment in jeopardy.

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Just when it seems that all is lost, they decide to complete the experiment anyway, vowing to stay in the dome for the full year and rallying the troops. With the help of about half a dozen montage sequences set to upbeat pop songs, the slobs and the squares unite for the sake of environmentalism and scientific progress.

This entry would be more eloquent, but I'm afraid watching Bio-Dome broke my brain. I must now learn how to operate with a blown mind. Bio-Dome runs out of energy well before the halfway mark, but in light of Baldwin's explosive revelations about Bio-Dome and the role it has played in his ministry, I think the film's aesthetic qualities are irrelevant. Bio-Dome doesn't exist to please critics or audiences. It exists to lead easily entertained dumbasses with low standards to Christ.

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I can only imagine the number of times some glue-sniffing Bio-Dome aficionado spots my man Stevie B on the street and says, "Hey, aren't you that idiot from that moronic Pauly Shore movie? I love you! That's my favorite movie!", only to have their hero Stevie B gaze deeply into their eyes and retort, "I sure am. Incidentally, have you accepted Jesus as your Lord and Savior? Not only is Christianity totally X-treme, but heaven is like Bio-Dome, only better!" Bam! Score another saved soul for the Stevester. Bio-Dome isn't merely entertaining halfwits. It's saving souls. It's doing God's work, one dumbass at a time.

How much of the experience wasn't a total waste of time? About 30 percent. That is, of course, if you take God out of the equation. But why would you?