If you've never read Seiichi Hayashi, pick up Drawn & Quarterly's Red Colored Elegy  

Red Colored Elegy (Drawn & Quarterly) is the longest sustained narrative produced by author Seiichi Hayashi, a cartoonist most recognized (when he’s recognized at all) for his opaque and elliptical short stories. His work tends to concern the interior lives of angsty young adults—most of them suffering from oppressive…

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DC tempts Wonder Woman fans to comics with 4 worthy Diana-centric offerings

Contrary to what people might think, the recent boom of comic book movies and television shows hasn’t come with a corollary increase in people buying comics. The industry is enjoying a relative resurgence overall, but sales don’t map the characters and franchises that are showing up on screens. The problem certainly…

Marvel just doesn’t know what to do with its group of young, horny X-Men

The first X-Men Prime was released in May of 1995, on the heels of possibly the best-received crossover in franchise history, the Age Of Apocalypse. That story was so well received that it became a problem for the books themselves, caught slightly off-guard by the runaway success of the alternate universe crossover.…

Meet the man who brought us zombies in The Abominable Mr. Seabrook

Best known as the man that popularized the word “zombie” in the English language, William Seabrook is a tragic figure that lived a fascinating life. He befriended Muslim Bedouins in Lebanon, engaged in voodoo rituals in Haiti, and spent time with cannibals in Ivory Coast. He was a popular, well-regarded author that…

A robot therapist proves itself useless in this exclusive Mooncop excerpt

Tom Gauld’s Mooncop is one of this season’s most hotly anticipated new graphic novels, and it arrives in stores today for readers craving Gauld’s deadpan humor, refined cartooning, and meaningful observations on the human condition. The Comics Panel review of Mooncop explores the complexity of Gauld’s composition, and…

Robots make bad therapists in the deadpan Mooncop

The lunar colony on Earth’s moon has one police officer, and he’s not doing too well. His 100 percent crime solution rate is only that high because there are no crimes for him to solve, and the quiet isolation of his work is starting to have a serious impact on his mental health. Tom Gauld’s new graphic novel, Mooncop…

BoJack Horseman producer serves up funny food in Hot Dog Taste Test

BoJack Horseman fans going through withdrawal after the conclusion of the third season can satisfy their craving for more of the show’s absurd, pun-filled humor by checking out Hot Dog Taste Test (Drawn & Quarterly), the second collection of comics by BoJack Horseman producer and production designer Lisa Hanawalt.…

The best comics of 2016 so far: The A.V. Club’s catch-up guide

The comics landscape is expanding every year, and it can be difficult to find what’s good in the sea of ongoings, miniseries, graphic novels, digital comics, and webcomics. 2016 has featured new works by some of the industry’s top talent as well as impressive projects by up-and-coming creators, so The A.V. Club …

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Fantagraphics’ new collection of Boy’s Club feels good, man

You know him, even if you don’t know his name. Pepe The Frog has become famous across the world—or, at least, across the internet—almost completely removed from the context of the stories in which he first appeared. Before the memes, the gifs, and long before “dat boi,” Pepe was just a humble cartoon amphibian in Matt…

D&Q exclusive: Panther puts a chilling twist on a little girl’s imaginary friend

Brecht Evens’ graphic novel Panther tells the story of a young girl and her feline imaginary friend, so it’s totally understandable for readers to expect Calvin & Hobbes-style all-ages hijinks in its pages. Panther is not that book, though. Yes, Christine’s imaginary friend is adorable, and there’s plenty for kids to…

G.I. Joe: Deviations makes Cobra Commander’s victory a laughing matter

This past March, IDW released a series of “Deviations” one-shots for assorted licensed comics, offering What If?-style stories detailing how these characters’ lives would change if one key element was altered. What if the Ghostbusters never crossed streams in their fight against the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man? What if…

The Nameless City offers a lush, politically conscious YA fantasy

The first book in a planned trilogy, The Nameless City (First Second Books) marks a new period in author Faith Erin Hicks’ career, and here she leans into the fantasy and young adult milieu that had, until now, merely flavored her work. Situated in a pre-industrialized world inspired in equal parts by Avatar: The Last…