What’s your favorite movie that’s better than the book it’s based on? 

Welcome back to AVQ&A, where we throw out a question for discussion among the staff and readers. Consider this a prompt to compare notes on your interface with pop culture, to reveal your embarrassing tastes and experiences, and to ponder how our diverse lives all led us to convene here together. Got a question you’d

Never forget they made a Fight Club video game in which Fred Durst was a playable character

Fight Club has a tortured legacy, managing to be at once a prime example of David Fincher’s meticulous craftsmanship, a subversive commentary on late-capitalist machismo, a totem embraced by the very knuckleheads it ostensibly criticizes, and an over-exposed subject of “my first thinkpiece”-style pop-culture takes.…

Traumatize your kids with R-rated movie scenes drawn in the style of a children’s book

In his collection Movies R Fun!: A Collection Of Cinematic Classics For The Pre-(Film) School Cinephile, Pixar story supervisor Josh Cooley reimagined iconic moments from R-rated classics in the style of a children’s book. Now, Reddit has compiled a gallery of some of the book’s drawings, which feature scenes from the…

Chuck Palahniuk is proudly taking credit for one of conservatives’ favorite insults

One of the most common insults that conservatives like to use against liberals—especially on social media—is “snowflake.” It’s macho bullshit that seeks to poke fun at left-leaning people for being “fragile” or “sensitive,” because empathizing with others instead of building a wall and kicking dirt at them is seen as…

Get Involved, Internet: Help Fight Club’s Chuck Palahniuk make a movie version of Lullaby

Chuck Palahniuk’s post-Fight Club novels exist on a very narrow sliding scale, with “Frustrating Failure” on one end, and “Frustrating Success” on the other. Of them, Lullaby is the one that probably rests the closest to the success side, telling a story that merges Palahniuk’s real feelings of grief over the murder…

From 17 to 55 years, authors took their time with these long-awaited book sequels

When Richard Russo published Everybody’s Fool last week, he joined the club of authors who waited more than a decade before publishing a sequel. Whether this group took their time creating a rich fantasy world (like J.R.R. Tolkien), checking in with characters to study the passage of time (à la Harper Lee), or for no…