Well, you’ve done it again. It’s the weekend before Christmas, Hanukkah is well underway, and the non-denominational winter solstice is Sunday. (Celebrators of Kwanzaa still have a little time, though). Alas, you haven’t finished your gift shopping yet, not even close. Not to fear: Here are some great books to give as gifts for the 2014 holiday season. So head out to a neighborhood bookstore (your neighborhood still has one, right?), and pick up one or two. Worst-case scenario: Find them online and then pay an arm, a leg, and your firstborn child to have them shipped overnight.

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For the “Han shot first” literature major: William Shakespeare’s Star Wars Trilogy: The Royal Imperial Boxed Set

This box set collects all three volumes—Verily, A New Hope; The Empire Striketh Back; and The Jedi Doth Return—that adapt the original trilogy into the language of the Bard. While a lover of letters who knows the ways of the Force may already be familiar with these texts, there’s always the next generation of Padawan learners to consider. The audiobook version is pretty great as well. [Andrea Battleground]

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For the Star Wars fanatic who wouldn’t read the previous entry even if gifted it: Star Wars Art: Posters

Because there’s no such thing as too much Star Wars—especially this year—why not pick up this weighty tome as well? This is the fifth entry in a George Lucas-curated series of books focused on the artwork of Star Wars, and it collects the poster art created for all six films, the Droids and Clone Wars animated series, gallery exhibitions, fan-club materials, foreign one-sheets, video games, and more and puts them in this tidy coffee-table book. Seeing the artwork as paintings—without any distracting logos, credits, or text at all—is a real treat, with each artist finding a way to highlight a particular character or characteristic from this well-observed universe. [Andrea Battleground]

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For the true believer seeking a visual bible of Devolution: Mark Mothersbaugh: Myopia

Corresponding with the first museum retrospective of Mark Mothersbaugh’s multimedia body of work, Myopia collects decades worth of beautiful mutations from the Devo co-founder, surreal provocations accompanied by the words of such prophets of new traditionalism as Wes Anderson and Shepard Fairey. [Erik Adams]

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For the film buff who says cinema peaked in the 1970s: The Ultimate Woody Allen Film Companion, Martin Scorsese: A Retrospective, and Altman

Here are three photo-heavy hardbacks, each celebrating a different legend of American cinema. The authors take essentially the same approach to their chosen director, moving chronologically through the respective oeuvres and breaking up the blocks of text with lots of splashy, behind-the-scenes images. Only have the dough for one? The Woodman companion is the most idiosyncratic, offering history and critical perspective. [A.A. Dowd]

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For the bookshelf braggarts who regularly remind you they finished Infinite Jest: The David Foster Wallace Reader

With the rise of e-books, bookshelves have become even more of an aesthetic statement than they used to be. A massive new volume collects selections from David Foster Wallace’s exceptional body of work, including his fiction, non-fiction, and even his teaching materials from his time as an English and creative writing professor. For the true DFW obsessive, splurge for the limited-edition version. [Andrea Battleground]

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For somebody who should just marry Tommy Wiseau already: The Room: The Definitive Guide

For those who aren’t sick of hearing about the “Citizen Kane of bad movies” after all this time, and who’ve already gobbled up Greg Sestero and Tom Bissell’s excellent The Disaster Artist, there’s The Room: The Definitive Guide. It’s an exhaustive look at the movie, including sections on how to act at screenings, point-by-point examinations of every major scene, and interviews with many of the players. (Though not, it should be noted, director-star Tommy Wiseau.) [Josh Modell]

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For the grown-up goth who has a coffee table now: So This Is Permanence

Joy Division singer Ian Curtis hanged himself at just 23 years old, shortly before the British band was to embark on its first American tour, but his depressing, depressing lyrics survived him, influencing generations. So This Is Permanence collects his handwritten words, setting them next to typeset versions of what they would become. (Sometimes they’re the same, but there are plenty of differences.) The book—lovely and clothbound to resemble the band’s posthumous collection Still—also features reproductions of old fan letters and flyers that Curtis’ widow had kept. [Josh Modell]

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For the morbidly curious Chicago crime buff: Gangsters & Grifters: Classic Crime Photos From The Chicago Tribune

The Chicago Tribune photo archives run deep, and Gangsters & Grifters gathers gorgeous, sharp images from the ugliest part of the city’s history—specifically the ’20s, ’30s, and ’40s. So yes, there are a few shots of Al Capone, but also of “perfect crime” perpetrators Leopold and Loeb, and even a shot of James Earl Ray, who was arrested in the city in 1952 and promised never to get in trouble again. The text is kept to a minimum, but the photos could inspire deeper reading on plenty of these ghastly folks. [Josh Modell]

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For music fans who like it so much they wanna look at it: Danny Clinch: Still Moving

Danny Clinch is the go-to rock photographer and has been for the past couple decades, and with good reason: He’s got an eye for portraits, candids, and live shots, and clearly the trust of his subjects. Bruce Springsteen, who Clinch has photographed on multiple occasions, even wrote the foreword for this lovely, heavy collection. But Clinch isn’t limited to classic rockers, as evidenced by his shots of everyone from Tom Waits to Nick Cave to Green Day to Rage Against The Machine. The common thread is that every shot in the book feels both intimate and artistic, which is no small feat when you’re taking shots of sweaty rockers. [Josh Modell]

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For the cross-media enthusiast who really appreciates the artifact: Language Lessons: Volume 1

Third Man Records, the independent record label founded by Jack White, expanded into books this year with its imprint Third Man Books. Its major release of the year is this box set, which features a 300-page hardbound book of poetry and prose, two vinyl LPs featuring poetry recitations and previously unreleased music from William Tyler, Destruction Unit, Ken Vandermark, and more. Also included are five broadsides featuring poetry and art from C.D. Wright, former Big Boys guitarist Tim Kerr, and folk artist Butch Anthony, among others. [Andrea Battleground]

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For the one friend who’s really into sci-fi yet refuses to get into comics/For that last holdout: Saga Deluxe Edition Volume 1

Praise for Brian K. Vaughan and Fiona Staples’ epic series is well documented, especially on this website. But there’s a reason for that: It’s really good. Both artists are firing on all cylinders with this title, and aside from its graphic sex, interstellar war, and philosophical slant, Saga is basically a family drama featuring multiple (flawed) heroes and an adorable kid. Just read it, already. [Andrea Battleground]

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For the comics reader who judges a book by its cover: Marvel Comics: 75 Years Of Cover Art

DK Publishers takes an intriguing approach to Marvel Comics history in this oversized hardcover, exploring how the publisher’s output evolved over 75 years by looking at some of Marvel’s most iconic covers. Providing page after page of dramatic visuals ranging from Jack Kirby’s bombastic work on early Marvel titles to David Aja’s evocative art for Hawkeye, it’s a fantastic resource for people that want to learn what goes into making an impactful cover image. [Oliver Sava]

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For the kid who wants to see princesses kick butt: Princess Ugg Vol. 1

After spending more than 10 years chronicling the adventures of the macabre teenage witch Courtney Crumrin, Ted Naifeh directs his attention to fantasy princesses in Princess Ugg, focusing on a brusque Viking princess enrolled at an academy that teaches her to act like a proper lady. With gorgeous art, a diverse cast, and a story that challenges traditional gender roles, it’s the perfect title for young female readers who want heroines who can fend for themselves. [Oliver Sava]

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For the big dreamer who can’t get out of bed: Little Nemo: Dream Another Dream

Winsor McCay’s Little Nemo stories are some of the greatest works in graphic storytelling, and Locust Moon Press pays tribute to his wildly imaginative work with this gargantuan anthology featuring short stories by some of the boldest names in comics. It’s a true labor of love from the small publisher, giving the industry’s top talents the opportunity to show what they can do with a limited page count, but very big pages. [Oliver Sava]

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For the student who loves the first day of school: Syllabus: Notes From An Accidental Professor

One of the most innovative creators in contemporary comics, Lynda Barry is also the brain behind the “Writing The Unthinkable” workshop, helping aspiring writers and artists brings their ideas to the page for the past decade. This new educational graphic novel presents her lesson plans and writing exercises to the public via her signature mixed media style, making it a more engaging syllabus than the usual packet handed out on the first day of class. [Oliver Sava]

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For the friend who can’t stop doodling Adventure Time characters: The Art Of Ooo

In the four years since its debut, Adventure Time has become a genuine cartoon phenomenon, and this art book shows why. This in-depth analysis of the series’ visual elements shows the thought that goes into creating the distinct aesthetic of Finn and Jake’s world, from background paintings to character designs and more. And the introduction by Guillermo Del Toro lends it some prestige for adult fans wary about displaying this title on their coffee table. [Oliver Sava]

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For literally everyone: The Onion Magazine: The Iconic Covers That Transformed An Undeserving World

Our sister publication The Onion has put out plenty of books over the years, but none have collected their Parade and New York Times Magazine parody covers… until now. These jokes are compact and powerful, each limited to just one colorful page. Iconic Weekender and Onion Magazine covers include “How Princess Diana Would Be Staying Fit At 47,” “Medical Malpractice: How Suing His Doctor Brought One Man’s Son Back To Life,” and “Your Old High School Teachers: How Many Of Them Are Dead Now?” Each is suitable for framing. [Josh Modell]

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