Sosie Bacon, Holly Hunter (Photo: Ali Paige Goldstein/HBO)

Here’s what’s happening in the world of television for Sunday, February 11. All times are Eastern.

Top picks

Here And Now (HBO, 9 p.m.): Wow, a new family drama by Six Feet Under creator Alan Ball, starring Holly Hunter and Tim Robbins as parents of a diverse family with a hint of the supernatural? Sign us up! Not so fast, says Gwen Ihnat, who found Here And Now akin to a “pontificating” and “ponderous” dinner party you can’t wait to ditch: “Our only motivation is to leave the Bayer-Boatwrights to their own devices as quickly as possible, in favor of a more palatable (and interesting) TV family to spend our Sunday nights with.” Like the Simpsons, say, or the Lannisters, when they return next year. Nevertheless, the stalwart Emily L. Stephens will review Here And Now weekly; let’s see if she has a better time with this crew than Gwen did.

Homeland (Showtime, 9 p.m.): If you like your Sunday night drama more on an international scale over the domestic, tune into Homeland, which returns tonight for season seven. Scott Von Doviak—who knows political intrigue from reviewing House Of Cards (in addition to the office politics of The Flash’s Star Labs, as well as the hive politics of Under The Dome)—will take over where former reviewer Joshua Alston left off to see if Homeland can recover from what Joshua called the show’s worst season ever.

Regular coverage

Star Trek: Discovery (CBS All Access, 8:30 p.m.): First-season finale
The Chi (Showtime, 10 p.m.)
Divorce (HBO, 10 p.m.):
In which Becki Newton goes toe-to-toe with Sarah Jessica Parker over the affections of one Thomas Haden Church.

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Wild card

Our Cartoon President (Showtime, 11 p.m.): We know that the brilliant Stephen Colbert is the executive producer of this new Showtime series, but it hasn’t really inspired more than a bemused grin from us so far, plenty short of any out-and-out guffaws or chuckles. Granted, this could be because we’re too traumatized from the actual Trump presidency, which seems like a nightmare cartoon anyway.

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