Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill call it quits with League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Tempest

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Alan Moore and Kevin O’Neill don’t want to do this anymore. They’re done with The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen and the comics industry as a whole, bowing out with one last hurrah in the pages of The League Of Extraordinary Gentlemen: The Tempest, a six-issue miniseries putting an end to storytelling as we know…

Captain America is a fascist, Batman has shitty Watchmen crossover in DC and Marvel’s latest insults

Every two weeks, Big Issues focuses on newly released comic-book issues of significance. This week, they are Batman #21, written by Tom King (The Vision, Sheriff Of Babylon) with art by Jason Fabok (Justice League, Detective Comics) and colorist Brad Anderson (Justice League, Detective Comics), and Secret Empire #0,…

“And how come Batman doesn’t dance anymore?” The importance of the Dark Knight’s lighter side

Last spring, I encountered a feeling altogether new: There was a Batman movie in theaters, and I had no interest in seeing it. Everything surrounding Batman V Superman: Dawn Of Justice—the dishwater palette of its marketing material, the resurrection (and re-dispatching) of Thomas and Martha Wayne, the words “directed…

Animated The Killing Joke trailer gets redrawn to be closer to original comic

Batman: The Killing Joke is a seminal story in the Batman mythos, the ultimate tale showing just how far the Joker is willing to go to spread his madness (and possibly how far Batman will bend or break his “no murder” rule, if Grant Morrison is to be believed). It’s cast a long shadow over modern Batman comics and…

13 times that comics characters met their makers

Comic books have a long history of real-life creators being thrown into fictional narratives, often in smaller cameo appearances, but also in grander ways that have a deeper impact on the narrative. This inventory looks at examples where comic-book characters interact with their creators, which has two different…

Miracleman: The Golden Age reprints Gaiman and Buckingham’s fascinating run

When Alan Moore and John Totleben departed Miracleman in 1989, they left behind a world overflowing with storytelling potential. In the final issues of Moore and Totleben’s run, Miracleman and his godlike allies reshaped the Earth into their idea of utopia, and that rapid transformation introduced a multitude of rich…

Read This: Rethinking the grim and gritty Dark Age of superhero comics

With the appearance of such seminal titles as Alan Moore’s Watchmen and Frank Miller’s The Dark Knight Returns in the mid-1980s, superhero comics entered their so-called and still-ongoing Dark Age, an era that represents either a cynical degradation of the medium or an elevation of the form to new artistic heights. Or…

We’re still waiting: 15 pop culture part ones that never got a part 2

Though they were one of the great singles bands of the British Invasion era, The Kinks adapted well to the late 1960s/early 1970s vogue for concept albums and rock operas, recording song-suites that spoke tunefully about generations of social change in the United Kingdom. After releasing two poor-selling…

Guy inspired by From Hell claims he solved the mystery of Jack the Ripper

Over the weekend, one of the oldest cold cases in the books was revived—that of Jack the Ripper, the notorious serial killer who murdered and eviscerated five prostitutes in London in 1885. A self-proclaimed “armchair detective,” Russell Edwards, took on solving the case as a macabre hobby and is releasing a book on…

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