Lucifer’s “Quintessential Deckerstar” strolls down memory lane & crashes into an uncertain future

Don’t let the ship portmanteau in the title fool you: “Quintessential Deckerstar” is quite an excellent episode of Lucifer. That’s on multiple levels too, as an episode that builds off everything that came before it, as an emotional character-driven piece, as a procedural, as a humorous forty-plus minutes of…

Booze and buddy cop shenanigans leave Lucifer with an "All Hands On Decker" situation

In a way, “All Hands On Decker” is a pretty special episode of Lucifer. It provides the audience with two of the series’ sure-fire (but sparingly used) dynamics in the form of a Lucifer/Dan team-up and the whole Lucifer lady squad. Both of these dynamics guarantee a fun episode, and that’s what Lucifer delivers.…

As promised, sins come back to haunt the “Prisoners” of Riverdale

After “Chapter Thirty-One”’s killer cliffhanger, “Chapter Thirty-Two: Prisoners” unfortunately isn’t a deep dive into just what happened to Midge backstage at Carrie: The Musical. Sure, there is a taste of it, in the short-but-sweet (and beautifully-directed) scene of Sheriff Keller questioning Jughead, Ethel, Moose,…

In “The Angel Of San Bernardino,” Lucifer fully embraces its DevilCop roots

I’ve said it before, I’ll most likely say it again: Despite its classification as a procedural, that aspect of the show is the thing Lucifer cares least about. That’s technically a good thing, as the show’s more concerned with character development and interactions—as well as arcs and mythology—than the whole cop show…

With “Orange Is The New Maze,” Lucifer’s favorite demon lets it all out

“Orange Is The New Maze” takes a simple procedural concept: One of the show’s main characters (Maze) has been wrongfully accused of murder, and it’s up to them (and friends) to try to prove their innocence. Well, there’s the part of the episode where Maze actively admits her guilt, but it’s all just a ploy for her…

On Lucifer, it takes three to tango (and solve crime or whatever)

After dealing with the rather stressful Cain and Abel saga in “Infernal Guinea Pig,” Lucifer naturally chooses to follow that up with a much lighter episode in the form of “Let Pinhead Sing!” Even Pierce’s mourning—which, to be clear, is mourning another failed attempt at death, not his brother dying again—in this…

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With “Infernal Guinea Pig,” Lucifer brings up a special guest

Let’s just get this out of the way now: The case-of-the-week in “Infernal Guinea Pig” is laughably underdeveloped and not integral to the actual point of this week’s episode at all. A South American cartel is the larger focus for the entire case, yet it manages to be such a small potatoes story compared to something…

Lucifer’s search for inspiration is more than “High School Poppycock”

I fear I’ve become repetitive when it comes to calling a particular episode of Lucifer “fun,” but that’s exactly what “High School Poppycock” is. Above all—except maybe daddy issues—that’s what Lucifer is, but it’s still important to note when it does well at this sort of thing. Especially as it does so in the form of…