Lady Bird avoids the traditional pitfalls of the coming-of-age drama

The Oscars are less than a month away, but there are a handful of films from this year’s Best Picture lineup we haven’t covered on Film Club. So we’re catching up with these contenders in a few special-edition episodes. Today, A.V. Club film editor A.A. Dowd and staff critic Ignatiy Vishnevetsky discuss number two on…

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Big Little Lies and Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri lead 2018 SAG Awards nominees

The 2018 Screen Actors Guild Awards nominations are out, and the frontrunners will be familiar to anyone who’s watched premium cable, independent films, or just looked over the Golden Globes nominees this year. Big Little Lies and Three Billboards In Ebbing, Missouri lead their respective packs, with the HBO drama…

The women of Saturday Night Live tell men shocked by sexual harassment revelations, "Welcome To Hell"

On last night’s very good Saoirse Ronan-hosted Saturday Night Live, the show’s women wheeled out another in SNL’s winning string of female-fronted music videos. Always cleverly conceived and ably performed by the show’s female cast members and hosts, last night’s new entry—which addressed the now-daily exposure of…

Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird soars into the upper echelons of coming-of-age cinema

Every time I watch Noah Baumbach’s Frances Ha (at this point, the number has to have climbed into double digits), I become more convinced that it’s one of the great comedies of the 21st century, not to mention one of the great films, period, about postgraduate life. Suddenly, I’m now also convinced that calling it…

Brooklyn’s Saoirse Ronan to star in Greta Gerwig’s directorial debut

Deadline reports that Saoirse Ronan has been cast in Greta Gerwig’s Lady Bird. Gerwig will direct from her own script, and it marks her solo directorial debut (in 2008, she co-directed the relationship drama Nights And Weekends with Joe Swanberg). Ronan is set to play Lady Bird’s protagonist, a high school senior…

Saoirse Ronan gives a winning performance in the rich romance Brooklyn

Brooklyn is a very nice movie. It’s an arthouse picture for people who don’t frequent arthouses—a tale of cultural displacement so sanitized and swooningly romantic that film buffs could recommend it to their parents and grandparents without hesitation. All of that may sound like a slam, but it’s not meant to be. It’s…

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