From Shaun to Baby Driver, Edgar Wright’s characters withdraw into music

For a film ostensibly about driving, Baby Driver’s most emblematic scene has nothing to do with a car or the road. It features the eponymous Baby (Ansel Elgort) at home futzing with retro electronic equipment, creating a mix from a tape recording that’s reminiscent of collage-style turntablists like Steinski and DJ…

Wintry mix: 12 video game songs in the spirit of the season

In Let’s Playlist, the Gameological staff assembles a themed lineup of video game music and packages it in a YouTube playlist. But we’re just providing the start. It’s up to you to nominate your own candidates and fill out the list (with a YouTube link if you can find it, please). We’ll choose our favorite

The 100 best films of the decade (so far), #1-20

Going in, we knew that this list—totaled up from ballots submitted by 11 A.V. Club staff members and contributors—would be eclectic, with plenty of dark horses sneaking up toward the front. Still, we were genuinely surprised at what ended up at the top of the list. Close to 300 films received votes, and not one of the…

Pay tribute to Chris Evans’ Scott Pilgrim character with these mocked up posters

With starring roles in Captain America and The Avengers films, as well as a non-superhero turn in Snowpiercer, it’s clear by now that Chris Evans can carry a film. Hell, with that physique, what couldn’t the man carry? And while we all love to see the patriotic Captain America punch some Soviet assassins in the face,…

Smarter, but at a price: 11 consequences of using 100 percent of your brain

Of all the fallacies regularly perpetuated by pop culture, none are quite as narratively useful as the erroneous scientific “fact” that humans use only 10 (or 8 or 20 or anything less than 100) percent of their brains. Often, this old chestnut is employed as a casual blow-off explanation for superpowers and special…

Here’s a new song from Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Dan “The Automator” Nakamura

Got A Girl, the collaborative project between actress Mary Elizabeth Winstead and Dan “The Automator” Nakamura, might seem like it came out of nowhere, but it really didn’t. The pair crossed paths working on 2010’s Scott Pilgrim Vs. The World, with the pair discovering they were both influenced by ‘60s French pop,…