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Felicity Huffman lands first TV role since college admissions scandal

Felicity Huffman served 11 days behind bars for her role in the 2019 debacle. She will appear in The Good Doctor this winter.

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Felicity Huffman
Felicity Huffman
Photo: Leon Bennett (Getty Images)

Think back, if you will, to a faraway year: 2019. The world looked very different back then. Masks were just something spooky to wear on Halloween. The words Don’t Worry Darling were simply a sweet way to soothe an anxious friend. But if one thing has remained constant throughout this turbulent period of history, it’s nepotism discourse. It truly is the gift that keeps on giving.

While Hollywood nepo babies are all the rage right now, 2019 had its own lively nepotism discourse: the college admissions scandal, in which (if you need a refresher) a number of famous parents participated in a conspiracy to bribe counselors and fake test results in order to secure spots at top universities for their children.

One of those parents was Felicity Huffman (Desperate Housewives), who served 11 days in federal prison in 2019 for her role in the scandal. Huffman has kept a low profile since the news broke, but just landed her first television role in four years.

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Huffman will appear on an upcoming episode of The Good Doctor as Janet Stewart, an attorney with “a fierce intellect and dry wit,” per Yahoo Entertainment. (We’re assuming her rather close relationship with the inner workings of the legal system will inform her performance.)

Deadline also reports that the episode, which airs March 6, is meant to introduce a spinoff titled The Good Lawyer, which stars both Huffman and Kennedy McMann (Nancy Drew), who will play a bright young attorney living with obsessive-compulsive disorder.

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If you somehow aren’t nepo-discoursed out (or want to detox from the current conversation with something a little more retro), Netflix’s documentary Operation Varsity Blues provides a comprehensive and juicy recap of the whole affair. Or you could just open up Twitter any day of the week and there will probably be something new.