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In the wake of yet again becoming a national laughingstock thanks to potential jurors dunking on him with the force of a thousand pissed-off Wu-Tang Clan fans, Martin Shkreli is back in the news. Business Insider reports the walking YouTube comment has been steadily buying up domain names related to journalists who have covered him, and after sitting on these sites for months, is finally customizing them to try and mock those people—which seems like an awfully long walk for what’s essentially a “u mad, bro?” insult.

Shkreli, who was convicted earlier this month on three counts of securities fraud and one count of mistakenly thinking he’ll be a popular guy in prison, has launched websites named after Vanity Fair tech reporter Maya Kosoff and CNBC editor Caroline Moss, among others. These sites utilize boilerplate right-wing language, such as calling Kosoff one of the “most vibrant Social Justice advocates today,” because far-right trolls think advocating for social justice is something you’d hate to be called out on. Since the start of 2017, Shkreli has purchased domain names for 12 people, including Maxwell Tani, the journalist reporting this story about the hero of bitter 14-year-olds everywhere.

Therefore, in the spirit of cooperation with Shkreli’s trolling desires (#trollgoals), The A.V. Club would like to offer him a tremendous deal, really super, no one else will get Shkreli a deal like this. I’d like to offer him the chance to use my domain, alexmclevy.com, for one month, to do with as he pleases, all for the low, low price of $44,185.50—otherwise known as the exact monthly cost of a lifesaving twice-a-day prescription for Daraprim, the drug for treating infections in people with HIV, after Shkreli bumped the price up 5,455 percent from $13.50 to $736.43 a pill. A.V. Club deputy managing editor Caitlin Penzey-Moog and social media manager Meg Brett are also joining in this exciting one-time offer, meaning he’ll get three domains for a month for less than $140,000! If it’s good enough for people dying of HIV-related infection, surely it’s good enough for Martin Shkreli. Well, no, the difference is that those people aren’t going to jail for securities fraud and trying to profit off the deaths of others, but still, our offer stands.