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Pop culture obsessives writing for the pop culture obsessed.

Reddit scary story We Used To Live Here gets a home on Netflix with Blake Lively

Blake Lively at a screening of The Rhythm Section at Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2020.
Blake Lively at a screening of The Rhythm Section at Brooklyn Academy of Music in 2020.
Photo: Jamie McCarthy (Getty Images)

From one screen to another, Netflix is working out a deal to the rights for We Used To Live Here, a psychological thriller originally shared on Reddit. The novella was written by user Polterkites—real name Marcus Kliewer—and posted in r/nosleep, a “place for redditors to share their scary personal experiences.” According to Deadline, Netflix has already selected Blake Lively to star in the film adaptation.

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The story starts with a new homeowner receiving a knock at her front door. On the other side, a family of five says they used to live in the home and would like to show the kids around. Reluctant and nervous to let the strange family in without her partner at home, she lets them peruse the home anyways, kicking off a set of events that she never expected—a series of events made worse when a snowstorm sweeps through and strands the protagonist and her visitors in the house together.

The A Simple Favor actor will also produce with Kate Vorhoff, alongside Ground Control Entertainment’s Scott Glassgold and The Batman director Matt Reeves and his 6th & Idaho partner Adam Kassan. Lively’s been busy lately, recently signing onto Netflix’s Lady Killer, based on the Dark Horse Comic series, as well as another thriller The Husband’s Secret, based on the Liane Moriarty novel. She will both star in and produce these forthcoming adaptations.

The book rights for Kliewer’s We Used To Live Here will be auctioned off shortly. This is the second r/nosleep story Netflix has snagged in the last year, following Matt Query’s My Wife & I Bought a Ranch, which Query’s brother, Harrison, is adapting. If adapting scary Reddit stories into films gets us out of reboot and sequel purgatory, we’ll take it.