A woman encounters her teenage self in this Luisa: Now And Then exclusive

If you could meet your teenage self, what would you say to them? Thirtysomething Luisa Arambol gets the opportunity to find out in Luisa: Now And Then. It’s the latest release from Humanoid’s Life Drawn line of graphic novels, which tell more grounded, intimate stories than the publisher’s signature sci-fi and fantasy…

Remembering one of the most gifted draftsmen from a golden age of comics

Few creators exemplify the promise and disappointment of the early decades of comic books as fully as Wally Wood. One of the great talents who flowered at EC in the early 1950s, he spent the rest of his career following that company’s implosion working across the industry as a cartoonist and occasional publisher, and…

Look at The Incantations Of Daniel Johnston and it will look back

The Incantations Of Daniel Johnston (Two Dollar Radio) relates the story of the real-life cult musician and artist. The graphic novel begins with Johnston floating in his mother’s womb, moves to his Beatles’ obsession and him recording music in his garage, then hits the how-he-became-famous high notes: Johnston…

Humanoids’ attempt to represent global comics shows just another boys’ club

Parsing The Tipping Point (Humanoids) is a frustrating experience. The anthology, a collection of 13 short stories and an attempt to point out the diversity of cartooning in the United States and Oceania, Western Europe, and Japan, contains works by some of the most audacious authors in the medium’s history. Paul Pope…

Stevenson and Greene’s Runaways sparks an exciting Secret Wars rebellion

One of the best things about this summer’s big event comics from both DC and Marvel has been the gleeful enthusiasm with which scores of creators explore a slew of alternate universes. Unencumbered by some of the more stifling parts of canon, writers and artists alike are committing to a long list of interesting…

The magic is back in Jem, while lameness shines in Regrettable Superheroes

Released in its native French in four volume installments over the course of 2009 to 2014, Laura Zuccheri and Sylviane Corgiat’s The Swords Of Glass (Humanoids) has the hallmarks of a contemporary classic. Too often, European fantasy set in “times long ago” relies on lazy clichés and stereotypes as crutches which prop…