Photo: Theo Wixson (Getty Images)

Arnold Schwarzenegger may be threatening to sue oil companies for knowingly destroying the environment with fossil fuels, but Kid Rock knows what it really takes to successfully make the transition from entertainment to politics in the post-Trump era: A spot in the WWE Hall Of Fame.

Rock, who swears he was just joking when he announced a Senate run last year, will nevertheless achieve the most important prerequisite for a role in the executive branch short of massive inherited wealth and/or being related to Donald Trump at an event in New Orleans on April 6, two days before WrestleMania 34. He’s being honored, apparently, for his (minimal) contributions to the world of WWE theme music, as his songs “Cocky” and “All Summer Long” have been used to soundtrack wrestling pay-per-view events. “American Bad Ass” was also used as The Undertaker’s entrance music for a short time back in the early 2000s, and his cover of ZZ Top’s “Legs” served the same purpose for WWE Diva Stacy Kiebler. He’s also performed at a couple of WWE benefit concerts, like 2012's Tribute To The Troops.

In the Billboard article announcing his induction, Kid Rock says, “Every time I go to a WWE event I always have a good time; there is nothing like it and no better fans in the world. The Hall of Fame ceremony will be a fun night and it will be great to see everyone again. I have so much respect for what those guys and girls do. I’m grateful to WWE for letting me be a part of WrestleMania weekend.”

The announcement appears to be controversial, with SB Nation’s wrestling site Cageside Seats reporting, “Kid Rock is going into the WWE’s Hall of Fame...for some reason” and WhatCulture joking that “only God knows why” the decision was made. Reaction on Twitter is similarly befuddled:



And it’s true: Even Trump appeared in the squared circle a couple of times before his induction into the celebrity wing of the Hall of Fame. Even Fred Durst, who appears as a playable character in several WWE video games, would appear to be more qualified. But, as was mentioned up top, is there any more perfect prerequisite for a career in post-Trump politics than being appointed to a position you’re wildly unqualified for?