When Frankenstein’s monster and the Wolfman grew up into De Niro and Nicholson

Anyone is allowed to make a movie about Dracula. Same goes for Frankenstein’s Monster, as long as the creature doesn’t look too much like the James Whale model. (This may explain why the character has recently and bafflingly resembled Aaron Eckhart.) A Wolf Man would be fair game, too, if he doesn’t have the surname…

Micropics: 18 narrowly focused biopics that need to be made

The problem with biopics is that people’s lives don’t easily reduce to 120 minutes of film. While it’s not impossible for a “cradle to grave” biopic to work, it’s exceedingly difficult. That’s why some successful biopics have focused on a smaller part of their subjects’ lives. The biopic Steve Jobs—released this…

Cheap thrills and big shocks: The real-life roots of Penny Dreadful’s Creature

While the Victorian London of Showtime’s Penny Dreadful may seem to contain more ghouls than chimney sweeps, some of the show’s outlandish plotlines are based in the period’s strangest nonfiction. In particular, Dr. Frankenstein’s monster (referred to on the show as The Creature or Caliban) can trace his roots through…

Rules Of Engagement’s Adhir Kalyan cast in Fox’s non-Frankenstein Frankenstein series

Fox has begun to fill out the cast for its upcoming drama pilot Frankenstein, beginning with Rules Of Engagement regular Adhir Kalyan as a a brilliant man who reanimates the body of a deceased individual. Those unfamiliar with Fox’s devil-may-care approach toward public domain properties may assume this means that…

Fox is making a show called Frankenstein, but it’s not about that Frankenstein

There’s something about the idea of a mad scientist digging up a bunch of corpses, stitching them together to create a monster, and then bringing that monster back to life that really resonates with production companies. Maybe it’s because their constant digging up of old ideas and cramming them together to make new…

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Max Landis’ Frankenstein movie is now Victor Frankenstein, is also now about Igor

Nobody can do straight adaptations of books anymore. They’re as played out as books are in general. Every movie version of a book has to have some kind of clever twist, like setting it in a different time period or making it a prequel/sequel or making someone else the point-of-view character. Now, finally, we know how …