The director of The Lobster trades humor for horror in the nightmarish Killing Of A Sacred Deer

The first thing we see and can never unsee in The Killing Of A Sacred Deer is a gaping chest cavity: flesh and bone parted to expose the organ inside, pumping frantically away in extreme close-up. To open with open-heart surgery sends an awfully clear message: Abandon all hope/concern that Yorgos Lanthimos, the now…

Nicole Kidman and Colin Farrell get creepy in trailer for The Killing Of A Sacred Deer

With 2015’s The Lobster, Greek weirdo auteur Yorgos Lanthimos achieved a surprising level of mainstream success in the States, given his film was about a dystopian alternate reality where people are turned into animals if they fail to find a mate in 45 days. But whereas that film was a darkly comic drama, bordering on…

Colin Farrell to play sexy Oliver North for Yorgos Lanthimos’ Amazon series

According to Variety, Colin Farrell will be reuniting with Lobster director Yorgos Lanthimos for a new Amazon miniseries about Oliver North and the Iran-Contra scandal. Naturally, handsome Irishman Colin Farrell will play not-so-disgraced military man Oliver North, and though we don’t know much about the specifics of…

Kirsten Dunst to star in AMC’s dark comedy series from the director of The Lobster

Kirsten Dunst is about to get weird, as Deadline reports that the Spider-Man and Fargo star has signed on for a new TV series from Yorgos Lanthimos, director of Dogtooth and The Lobster. Titled On Becoming A God In Central Florida, the series is being developed at AMC, and would star Dunst as a “minimum-wage Orlando…

Alicia Silverstone will probably get weird in new film from The Lobster director

Let’s be real, this probably hasn’t happened since 1995, but it’s time to get really excited about something Alicia Silverstone is doing. You see, the Silverstonaissance (Silverstone Age?) is nigh. According to Deadline, the erstwhile Cher Horowitz has been cast in the next film from The Lobster director Yorgos…

Touring the surreal dystopias of The Lobster and High-Rise

Yorgos Lanthimos’ The Lobster and Ben Wheatley’s High-Rise are both dystopian black comedies. Both are set mostly in one building, both feature gruesome violence, both have a lonely bachelor for a protagonist, and both were made in the UK— but other than that, they’ve got basically nothing in common. On this week’s…

Colin Farrell is looking for love—or else—in an exclusive The Lobster mini-trailer

There’s nothing in theaters this week (or any other) quite like The Lobster, the alternately funny and horrifying new movie from Dogtooth director Yorgos Lanthimos. The film envisions a world where people are forced to find romantic companionship under penalty of being transformed into an animal. Most choose dogs, but…

From self-induced amnesia to DIY dystopia: 8 tips for keeping a strange family secret

Does your family have a dark, bizarre, or possibly ridiculous secret that needs keeping? Worry no more, because The A.V. Club has dug high and low, across daytime soap opera and Pulitzer Prize-winning dramas, to find you eight surefire, completely feasible solutions for any and all issues of consanguineal…

Here’s the trailer for The Lobster, one of our favorites from this year’s Cannes

The A.V. Club’s own Ignatiy Vishnevetsky called the The Lobster, the latest surreal, darkly comedic film from Dogtooth director Yorgos Lanthimos, “funny,” “unsettling,” and, “occasionally gruesome” when he watched it at this year’s Cannes Film Festival. Now, you can see for yourself—in bite-sized trailer form, at…

Cannes gave out its awards this weekend, with some surprises

The Cannes Film Festival wound down this weekend, with Jacques Audiard’s Dheepan picking up the Palme d’Or—the most prestigious award in all of film festivaldom—at the closing ceremony. This came as a big surprise, given that Audiard’s immigrant drama/vigilante thriller wasn’t considered a major contender on the…

Natural born thrillers: 18 directors who haven’t made a horror film, but should

Looked at one way, most of David Lynch’s movies are horror movies. Is there a more petrifying moment in cinema than the Winkie’s diner scene in Mulholland Dr.? Is there a more menacing monster than Dennis Hopper’s gas-huffing pervert gangster in Blue Velvet? And what genuine “master of horror” has conceived of a…