Remembering the stars we lost in 2023

Remembering the stars we lost in 2023

2023 has already seen the loss of Lisa Marie Presley, Jeff Beck, and more.

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Gina Lollabrigida, Lisa Marie Presley, Jeff Beck
Photo: Archive, Bryan Steffy, Ebet Roberts (Getty Images)

2023 is a new year, but we’ve already lost a handful of stars who made an indelible impact on pop culture during their time on Earth. The A.V. Club pays tribute to some of the biggest names we’ve lost so far this year.

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Earl Boen

Earl Boen

Earl Boen in T2
Earl Boen in T2
Photo: CBS via Getty

A veteran character and voice actor, Boen will be most familiar to film audiences for his role in the first three Terminator films, playing the endlessly tormented Dr. Peter Silberman in The Terminator, T2: Judgment Day, and Terminator 3: Rise Of The Machines. With a track record spanning sitcoms, dramas, video games, action movies, and pretty much anything else an actor might’ve put his talents toward in the second half of the 20th century, Boen accrued almost 300 credited roles across a 40-plus year career. Per Variety, he died in Hawaii, after being diagnosed with stage four lung cancer last year. Boen was 81.

Boen made his name first and foremost in TV comedy: His early resumé, from the mid-’70s onward, is dotted with many of the biggest sitcoms of the era, including MASH, Three’s Company, Barnaby Jones, and more. Even as a young man, Boen’s hangdog face and gift for the dour made him a regular presence on shows looking to inject a little wry, glum wit into their ensembles for an episode; although he occasionally settled into a longer role (including a single-season stint on It’s A Living in 1981), Boen would remain a “freelancer” for most of his career. [William Hughes]

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Adam Rich

Adam Rich

Adam Rich
Photo: Stephen Shugerman (Getty Images)

Best known for his role on ABC’s Eight Is Enough, Adam Rich also made appearances on other television series throughout the ’80s and ’90s, including The Love Boat, The Six Million Dollar Man, St. Elsewhere, and Baywatch. His last major role occurred in 2003, when he played himself in the David Spade comedy Dickie Roberts: Former Child Star.

Rich suffered from addiction issues that contributed to legal trouble over the years, including an arrest in 1991 for attempting to break into a pharmacy, per the AP. He was open about his experiences with mental illness; publicist Danny Deraney told the outlet that the actor’s depression “defied treatment.”

“Adam was simply a wonderful guy. He was kind, generous and a warrior in the fight against mental illness,” Deraney shared in a statement posted to Twitter. “Adam did not have an ounce of ego. He was unselfish and always looked out for those he cared about. Which is why many people who grew up with him feel a part of their childhood gone, and sad today. He really was Americas Little Brother.” [Mary Kate Carr]

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Jeff Beck

Jeff Beck

Jeff Beck performing
Photo: Lionel FLUSIN/Gamma-Rapho via Getty Images

A Grammy winning-guitarist, credited with refining and popularizing the sound of the electric guitar in modern rock music, Jeff Beck had early success with British band The Yardbirds in the 1960s before embarking on a long and winding solo career. Although he never reached the mainstream or commercial heights of many of his contemporaries and successors—most of whom acknowledged him as a massive influence on their own work—Beck continued to tour, play, and perform well into the 2020s, with his list of collaborators encompassing a handy Who’s Who of the entire span of modern rock. Beck died reportedly of bacterial meningitis. Per Variety, he was 78.

Born in England in the 1940s, Beck gravitated toward music early, building his own guitars as a teenager, and beginning to play with bands while in college in the early ’60s. Like many of the budding rock guitarists of the era, Beck was drawn to the sounds of rhythm and blues, transforming and playing with those sounds to create the foundations of rock music. In 1965, after Eric Clapton departed The Yardbirds, Beck signed on to replace him as the band’s lead guitarist.

Beck’s tenure with the band was relatively short—just 20 months, before he quit and/or was fired after bailing on the group in the midst of a U.S. tour—but highly influential. The Yardbirds had many of their biggest hits during that period; meanwhile, Beck’s experimentation with adding fuzzier, more distorted tones to his guitar paved the way to the creation of more psychedelic rock. Beck only made one album with The Yardbirds, 1966's Roger The Engineer, before going solo in 1967. [William Hughes]

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Lisa Marie Presley

Lisa Marie Presley

Lisa Marie Presley
Photo: Bryan Steffey (Getty Images)

The only daughter of Elvis and Priscilla Presley, Lisa Marie was born on February 1, 1968, in Memphis, Tennessee. Her father being the King of Rock ’n Roll, her childhood was a whirlwind. He and Priscilla divorced when she was four, and Lisa Marie moved with her mother to Los Angeles. She split her time between L.A. and Memphis until her father’s death in 1977.

Her father’s death was the beginning of a tumultuous adolescence. She dropped out of high school and began abusing drugs, winding up in Scientology’s Celebrity Center rehab facility when she was 17. While in rehab, she met her first husband, musician Danny Keough. The couple were married in 1988 and had two children, Riley and Benjamin, before divorcing in 1994. [Matt Schimkowitz]

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Gina Lollobrigida

Gina Lollobrigida

Gina Lollobrigida
Photo: Archive (Getty Images)

Gina Lollabrigida made her English language debut in 1953 with John Ford’s Beat The Devil, but she had already made over 20 films in Eurore before arriving stateside, per The New York Times. Lollabrigida went on to make a significant impact on the U.S. film indurstry in the 1950s and 60s, starring in films like Trapeze, The Hunchback of Notre Dame, and Come September and even earning a parody on The Flintsones. While she was a big star in the States, she remained an icon in her native Italy through her entire life.

In the 1970s, she embarked on a career behind the camera, publishing a book of photographs titled Italia Mia in 1973. In 1975, her interview with Cuban leader Fidel Castro was screened in Berlin as part of the documentary Ritratto di Fidel. Her final film appearance was in the French comedy XXL in 1997. [Drew Gillis]

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