Much has been written and said about Radiohead in the decades they’ve been active, but over the years one of the world’s most respected voices in music criticism has remained notably silent. Now, Fox News has finally chimed in, letting us know what everyone’s favorite race-baiting, gun-loving, conspiratorial fever dream of a network thinks about the Lads from Oxfordshire’s musical legacy.

Aired on The Greg Gutfeld Show, Fox’s long-awaited verdict comes from a clip in which four dorks (and one cool guy with tattoos and a backward baseball cap) discuss who’s likely to be the next inductee to the extremely relevant Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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Katherine Timpf, who Wikipedia tantalizingly describes as someone who “regularly provides political commentary expressing her millennial and libertarian views as they relate to culture, political correctness, feminism, and economic issues,” weighs on on Radiohead’s chances, stating that they deserve to win, “seeing as it’s about fame and not talent.”

Timpf continues:

“. . .the kind of guys that I like have to be three things: strange, malnourished, and sad. Those guys always like Radiohead, so I’ve been having to pretend to like Radiohead for years to get these men, even though the music is just, like, elaborate moaning and whining for ring tone sounds”

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In case we’re ever in danger of taking the musical opinions of Fox News correspondents too seriously, it’s important to remember that this is the network whose recent, notable engagements with pop culture include lovingly overlaying footage of massive aerial bombings with Toby Keith tracks and wringing its hands at the dangers of Kendrick Lamar condemning police killings (quoth Geraldo Rivera: “This is why I say that hip-hop has done more damage to young African-Americans than racism in recent years.”).

In the latter case, we got Lamar sampling Fox soundbytes on DAMN. The best result of this most recent commentary, obviously, is a Radiohead track in which “strange, malnourished, and sad” is spoken by a robot, reversed, isolated to one stereo channel, and hidden underneath the rest of the song.

[via Pitchfork]

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