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Last of the Breed: The Dave Evans Story

2013
Documentary/Drama
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Cast

Peter Halpin (Beekman)Tom T. Hall (Self)Lucas Bentley (Roy Lee Centers)Shane Woodson (Billy Hurst)Andy Rappos (Todd)Griffin Cole (Todd Evans)

Director

Matthew J. Pellowski

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Synopsis

Long time Bluegrass singer and songwriter Dave Evans heard a voice when he was just a child at the young age of thirteen. "From the ole Queen City, to New Boston town, Ironton and Ol' Hanging Rock, I've made every stop, I've played every station, while traveling down Ol' Highway 52." The ambitious youngster who at the time was just acquainting himself with the craft of music and the talent of playing the banjo, had written these mature lyrics that would come to pass as a bold prediction, some say vision, of his life to come. By age 18, the boisterous teenager and close knit family man from Portsmouth, Ohio landed his first professional job when he was asked to join Earl Taylor's Stoney Mountain Boys band where Evans would play the banjo. The talented young "Banjer Picker," as he liked to call himself, was soon gathering a reputation for having lightning quick hands when it came to stroking a banjo, and over the course of a year quickly discovered his talents as an emerging singer and songwriter as well. When an unfortunate illness struck his mother in 1969, Evans, true to his "family above all" roots, returned home to Ohio to care for his Mother and be with his loved ones. After her passing, Evans remained in Ohio until the beckoning of Bluegrass music began calling his name once again. Playing in various clubs, fairs, theatres, and festivals; he harnessed his talents until an opportunity presented itself in 1972 that he couldn't resist. Larry Sparks, known for his hard driving Bluegrass ballads, had approached Dave about joining up with his band of musical outlaws and soon Evans was a "Lonesome Rambler." It was during those years playing and touring with the Ramblers that Evans would master his deep tenor singing style that would become a staple of his identity within the Bluegrass community. As with many Legends, their stardom comes to pass through a natural progression, and Evans, true to form, after bouncing around in numerous bands of notoriety, eventually embraced his destiny and moved from being a back up vocalist and band mate, to a front man and leader of his own crew. In 1978 Dave Evans formed "Dave Evans and the River Bend," a vehicle which would finally allow the talented musician to step into the spotlight and produce the music he had always dreamed of making as a child. Soon Evans, as predicted, had played every venue, theatre, and stage along the long and winding "Ol' Highway 52." The River Bend thrived for about a decade, touring various states and territories and recording 5 albums with long time Bluegrass icons, Rebel Records. During the 90's Evan's career came to an immediate and unfortunate halt when again family came calling, and an incident transpired that to this day, has never been clearly explained to the public. After his son was attacked and shot at by a local group of troublemakers, Evans, being an individual from a time when men were men, took the law into his own hands. As the famous song "Pastures of Plenty," which Evans covered in his album "Classic Bluegrass" goes: "My land I'll defend with my life need it be, cause my pastures of plenty must always be free." Evans did just that by abiding by such a credo, but unfortunately men who follow their inner voice sometimes find that truth from within, often doesn't fit within the exterior world. Evans soon fell victim to a political agenda scorned from run-ins with past public officials that had made it their mission to retaliate against the former Lonesome Rambler who had made some enemies along the way to becoming a Bluegrass Living Legend. Evans, the respected artist, musician, and family man who had avoided a record his entire life, was sentenced to 10 years in prison for an "assault" charge. The popular, internationally recorded Bluegrass star would soon vanish from the public eye and the music business for a full decade. Evans, who was incarcerated in Ohio, was well known by inmates who had been long time fans of the local boy who had made it bi

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